‘Alpha and Omega’ is better than ‘Prodigy’

In “Star Trek: Prodigy,” The Enterprise gathers its crew and jumps into hyperspace to avoid aliens who need warp mode after a less-than-friendly encounter. This is the same diversion Chantal Cofield and Silvia Vega…

‘Alpha and Omega’ is better than ‘Prodigy’

In “Star Trek: Prodigy,” The Enterprise gathers its crew and jumps into hyperspace to avoid aliens who need warp mode after a less-than-friendly encounter. This is the same diversion Chantal Cofield and Silvia Vega Jacovini decide to involve their young passengers in at the outset of their show, one that’s way too familiar, particularly as it progresses.

The animated short film is the first episode from Amazon Studios original kids series “Alpha and Omega,” a lineup in which Amazon presents series made specifically for kids as well as individual original pilots aimed at Amazon subscribers. Though J.J. Abrams has the same underlying premise, the unique setting of Alex Kurtzman’s other series, “Star Trek: Discovery,” contributes to that series’ popularity, whereas “Prodigy” is forced to compete for the short attention span of children and their parents.

“Prodigy” is no different. Along with being visually familiar, it’s repetitive and confuses plot points that are already spouted by almost every terrestrial creature and anthropomorphic supervillain in the galaxy. Once the ship has been dispatched into hyperspace — and even at this early point in the series — and there’s a full 24 minutes to squeeze in as many hits as possible, the credits roll. The marketing hype on the short episode is either too dense or simply boring, in which case, “Alpha and Omega” is more enticing.

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