Anti-vaccination activist responds to negative backlash after sharing ‘prank’ email

Alarmed by a fake lawsuit stemming from an allegedly faulty vaccine known as COVID-19, the mayor of Sarnia, Ontario, Rachael Burford, announced she would share personal information about herself with a teenager from the…

Anti-vaccination activist responds to negative backlash after sharing 'prank' email

Alarmed by a fake lawsuit stemming from an allegedly faulty vaccine known as COVID-19, the mayor of Sarnia, Ontario, Rachael Burford, announced she would share personal information about herself with a teenager from the town in exchange for releasing information about vaccinations

Yesterday, Burford posted on her personal Facebook account a screenshot of a message she received from someone asking whether she had been immunized against COVID-19, a polio-preventing vaccine. Burford read it aloud before sharing it on Facebook.

With 8,400 shares, the post has since gone viral. Burford’s clip has even reached the media and has received attention from outlets around the globe.

Responding to backlash from parents and anti-vaccination advocates, Burford attempted to clarify her position in a Facebook post dated Sunday.

“It’s unfortunate that a group of individuals who sincerely believe that vaccines are very dangerous and should not be administered have chosen to stoop to such a low level by concocting a fake lawsuit and using it to shame, harass and bully me,” Burford wrote.

Burford said she received the message over a microphone and webcam at the health department office in Sarnia in May. When she asked who sent the message, Burford says she was told: “I don’t know … Your email address for your personal response is [password].so [password] could be in your medical record so I’m not sure if that’s the right answer.”

“After that exchange, my reply was ‘no,’” Burford continued.

A copy of the vaccine claimed to be FDA-approved but ultimately showed up to healthcare providers as falsely supported by the FDA. Burford acknowledged that she had not consulted a doctor or any of the other authorities about the vaccine before giving it to the health department.

The message proved to be fake.

But still, Burford concluded her post in an attempt to emphasize that the message proves an “alarmingly invasive act.”

“I had no recourse but to respond back to this unwanted, crude and creepy attempt to frame me,” Burford wrote. “My response today addresses the privacy issue in a way that seems in line with the current debate.”

Leave a Comment