California has gotten about as much snow as it gets

Irvine, California — Much of the state of California has been pretty dry lately, but a recent strong storm drenched the landscape with rain and snow, spurring a surge in Yosemite Valley and its…

California has gotten about as much snow as it gets

Irvine, California — Much of the state of California has been pretty dry lately, but a recent strong storm drenched the landscape with rain and snow, spurring a surge in Yosemite Valley and its waterways.

Rio Vista is in a downpour right now. Someone please pick up the water @StephenHarber pic.twitter.com/fk2xw4NEOJ — Billy Kelly (@BillyKellyTV) June 1, 2015

The Sierra Nevada snowpack — one of the most important sources of drinking water during the hot, dry summer months — stood at 75 percent of average on Friday. The precipitous drop is the result of heat, drought and the back-to-back storms, which were part of a prolonged weather pattern that brought above-average precipitation to the West Coast.

The storms delivered enough rain and snow to make up for lost time in California’s iconic destinations. By the time the mountains were largely covered in fresh snow this weekend, soggy reservoirs were up about seven percent, and the amount of water in the Yosemite River was 43 percent of its average total.

My boy https://t.co/jqDhSBFTzv — David Wyckoff (@davidwyckoff) June 1, 2015

The Sierra Nevada received enough snow to make up for 4.8 feet of rain during the past week. This avalanche is about 1,000 feet tall — and still we don’t even know how much there is! pic.twitter.com/S4FXPdgT6b — Brandon Ruggiero (@brandonreyc) June 1, 2015

According to the National Weather Service, the rain-snow ratio across northern California stood at 6.5 inches per inch at San Jose’s airport on Monday, and at 5.2 inches per inch at San Francisco International Airport.

Much of that snow came down at altitudes of up to 4,000 feet. The Sierra winds and steep terrain can deliver intense ice and snow, especially in this season’s new season. The combination of the cold air, snow and wind are said to create the conditions that combined to make for a series of deadly crashes on highways in the state’s high mountains.

Western mountains are experiencing #BeastOfTheSouth along with #NorCal’s #StormsofOctober2014. pic.twitter.com/LpNYu3n4WE — National Weather Service (@NWS) June 1, 2015

Elsewhere in the West, snowfall fell in high Sierra, and thunderstorms and windstorms dropped copious amounts of rain in Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Oregon and Nevada.

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