Cape Town attacks have something to do with “mistaken identity”

By the CNN Wire Staff • Updated 27th April 2013 Researchers are doing their best to find the culprit behind a rash of shark attacks in the Cape Town waters last year. And it…

Cape Town attacks have something to do with "mistaken identity"

By the CNN Wire Staff • Updated 27th April 2013

Researchers are doing their best to find the culprit behind a rash of shark attacks in the Cape Town waters last year. And it may have something to do with “mistaken identity.”

Dozens of people have been bitten by sharks off Cape Town since January 2012. This year is shaping up to be the worst in more than 10 years.

A 40-year-old Japanese woman, who has yet to be identified, was mauled last week off Port Elizabeth after reportedly approaching a big white shark.

Though not an attack, this news provoked an uproar on the internet because it put her among an alarming list of victims.

The list includes Australian golfer Mick Fanning, South African surfer Floyd Romesburg, British diver Paul Barrett and three other British tourists.

All the shark victims are white or color-shifted males between 18 and 35 years old.

If you can stand it, here’s a look at the chart of 31 whitish-brown sharks reported in the Cape Town area since January 2012.

What leads researchers to believe this is all a coincidence?

Well, there’s this:

In 2005, President Nelson Mandela inaugurated the Phumelele Observatory, a building situated in the middle of a national park.

Inside, is a digital jellyfish diagram. The building is heavily lit, and the ocean water streaming over it is filled with electric lights.

The symbol representing the jellyfish was made by 37-year-old Wesley Walle from Cape Town, a specialist in the study of global water quality, as part of a public website he created called aquaheaven.

The symbol also remains on the indoor cover of the national parks throughout the country.

“These brilliant white jellyfish come from the shadow of this new observatory, and the lights shine on them, shining through their eye holes,” said Walle.

“Each had an identification number or identification number unique to that location. So, they have to be mistaken identity.”

Odd thing, anyway. But until someone proves otherwise, for now all this means is that whoever is behind these shark attacks will likely be caught on video with their latest victim in the background.

Leave a Comment