On New York City’s streets, people were counted by their endurance after attacks

On Monday morning, when New York City saw its worst terrorist attack in the past decade, the Muslim population that makes up 10 percent of its population witnessed the effects of a terror that…

On New York City’s streets, people were counted by their endurance after attacks

On Monday morning, when New York City saw its worst terrorist attack in the past decade, the Muslim population that makes up 10 percent of its population witnessed the effects of a terror that killed eight. In the day’s early hours, worshippers prayed near the spot where a rented van plowed into a crowd of Muslims early in the morning. At the site of a second attack in lower Manhattan just hours later, many of the city’s Muslims learned that, according to New York police, as many as 10 people, many of them children, had been killed. People turned to Twitter and Facebook to share images of mass murder. They prayed and shared prayers, and soon video appeared of crowds out on the streets.

That evening, Imam Shamsi Ali was up late updating the [email protected] internet channel, the masehism.org website, on the movement after the attacks. “Many people who were early and who were out, their houses were destroyed,” he said. “A lot of furniture was destroyed, and they are receiving police protection.” Later, in the night, after 8 p.m., as crowds streamed through Times Square, he saw the outcome of the day.

“When we were in the square, some people on the other side started screaming and they were like: ‘There is someone who is handing out money, we call this guy.’ There was a good spirit … There were more people in the world helping than helping.”

Photos and video were also collected at the prayer services held near the van attack, as well as at another prayer service in Lower Manhattan for friends and family of one of the people killed. On Sunday night, dozens of people shared their stories on social media. A mother described shielding her 3-year-old son from the blast of gas in her restaurant. A distraught brother described rushing to get to his mother and sister. A friend told of finding a dead man in the wreckage. “I had to break his heart,” said one woman. “I couldn’t allow him to go on living like that.”

On Monday morning, the planned service for the victims in lower Manhattan was canceled. The ground was reported as saturated, the boulevard was still closed, and “at this moment in time,” according to Mayor Bill de Blasio, “there is no credible threat against New York City.”

De Blasio is up for re-election in November. Muslims hope he will keep their number safe. On Monday afternoon, as the city lost eight more lives, God don’t cry for me. — Naweed Shaikh (@Nickgrabs) September 24, 2018

They counted eyes in the sky. Then counting hearts and minds. In New York City on Monday morning, people were counted by their endurance.

Read the full story at The New York Times.

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