What’s the best way to get information about the hurricane season?

The hurricane season starts on June 1 each year and ends on Nov. 30. The Hurricane & Storm Surge Program at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science tracks hurricane…

What’s the best way to get information about the hurricane season?

The hurricane season starts on June 1 each year and ends on Nov. 30. The Hurricane & Storm Surge Program at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science tracks hurricane activity in the Atlantic. NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information runs the Hurricane Information & Forecast System website. There is also an interactive map showing forecast path for each tropical cyclone in the Atlantic and the Pacific. NOAA posts updates online about the anticipated hurricane season. The main impacts of hurricanes are rainfall, wind, storm surge and flooding. Here are the meteorological forecasting models expected for hurricane season:

For Atlantic Atlantic early prediction

1. El Nino

2. El Nino-neutral

3. El Nino-weak

4. Neutral

5. Pacific El Nino-neutral

6. Pacific neutral

7. Pacific El Nino-weak

For the Caribbean eastern tropical Atlantic (Eastern Pacific) and Caribbean western tropical Atlantic (Western Pacific) early prediction

1. El Nino

2. El Nino-neutral

3. Neutral

4. El Nino-weak

5. Pacific El Nino-neutral

6. Pacific neutral

For the Central and South Atlantic (Western Pacific) early prediction

1. El Nino

2. El Nino-neutral

3. Neutral

4. Neutral

5. Pacific El Nino-neutral

6. Pacific neutral

For the North Atlantic (Eastern Pacific) early prediction

1. Neutral

2. El Nino-neutral

3. El Nino-weak

4. Neutral

5. Pacific El Nino-neutral

6. Pacific neutral

For the Atlantic subtropical Atlantic (Eastern Pacific) and Atlantic subtropical Atlantic (Western Pacific) early prediction

1. El Nino

2. El Nino-neutral

3. El Nino-weak

4. Neutral

5. Pacific El Nino-neutral

6. Pacific neutral

For the United States Eastern Pacific Hurricane Region early prediction

1. Pacific El Nino

2. El Nino-neutral

3. Neutral

4. Pacific El Nino-neutral

5. Neutral

6. Pacific El Nino-weak

For the United States Central Pacific Hurricane Region early prediction

1. Neutral

2. El Nino-neutral

3. El Nino-weak

4. Pacific El Nino-weak

5. Pacific neutral

6. Pacific neutral

For the United States Gulf of Mexico and Central Atlantic Gulf (Eastern Pacific) Early prediction

1. Neutral

2. Neutral

3. El Nino-neutral

4. El Nino-weak

5. Pacific El Nino-neutral

6. Pacific neutral

For the Western Atlantic Early prediction

1. El Nino

2. El Nino-neutral

3. El Nino-weak

4. Neutral

5. Pacific El Nino-neutral

6. Pacific neutral

Here are the 30 most powerful Atlantic hurricanes recorded over the last 100 years, according to the National Hurricane Center:

For the West Coast of North America, here is a compilation of the 30 strongest land hurricanes in the 30-year period of 1968 through 1992:

For more information about the public hurricane information available through the National Hurricane Center:

For more information about the National Weather Service in America:

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